Emotional Sensitivity and Intensity: How to manage intense emotions as a highly sensitive person - learn more about yourself with this life-changing self help book

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Emotional Sensitivity and Intensity: How to manage intense emotions as a highly sensitive person - learn more about yourself with this life-changing self help book

Emotional Sensitivity and Intensity: How to manage intense emotions as a highly sensitive person - learn more about yourself with this life-changing self help book

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A significant effect of age, F(9,229) = 27.62, p< 0.001, η 2 p = 0.52 was found. 5-year-olds had lower performances on the three tasks (M = 77.6%, SD = 1.3) than 6-year-olds (M = 86.6%, SD = 1.2). No significant difference between two consecutive age groups was revealed after age 6, indicating a linear improvement of performances from age 6 to adulthood. Results also revealed a significant effect of task, F(2,460) = 43.91, p< 0.001, η 2 p = 0.16. Worse performances were observed for the emotion matching task (M = 85.20%, SD = 0.6) in comparison with the performances obtained for the facial discrimination task (M = 90.50%, SD = 0.6) and for the emotion identification task (M = 90.82%, SD = 0.5) ( p< 0.001). However, no significant difference between the performances in the emotion identification task and the facial discrimination task was observed. There was also a significant task x age interaction, F(18,460)= 2.65, p< 0.001, η 2 p = 0.09. 4-, 6-, and 7-year-olds had worse performances on the emotion matching task than the two other tasks (emotion identification and facial discrimination task) ( p< 0.01), but no difference was observed between the emotion identification and the facial discrimination task. The 5-year-old children had better performances on the emotion identification task than on the emotion matching task ( p< 0.001) and the facial discrimination task ( p = 0.04), but no difference was observed between the emotion matching and facial discrimination task. Any significant difference was observed among the three tasks from age 8 to adulthood.

These provocative chapters challenge what we think we know about emotional sensitivity, intensity, and giftedness. Combining psychological theories, spiritual wisdom, and practical exercises, it brings you to new ways of thinking about yourself, so you can reclaim your unique empathic and intellectual gifts, and fulfil your creative potential.We all are continuously evolving and growing, so I reserve the right to change my mind and have to stay open to where my intuition leads.

In the current study, we aimed to investigate how individual differences in interoceptive sensibility and emotional conceptualization interact to moderate different facets of the emotional experience, namely, emotional intensity, arousal, and granularity. We observed that subjective measures of interoceptive sensibility were significantly correlated with measures of emotional conceptualization. PCA analysis revealed two independent factors, labeled Sensibility and Monitoring, in which measures of interoceptive sensibility and emotional conceptualization shared variance. The two factors had somewhat different effects on emotion experience, particularly in the DRM (but not in the ED) task. Sensibility was negatively (albeit non-significantly) related to emotional intensity and granularity for positive words, but positively related to granularity for negative words, whereas Monitoring was negatively related to emotional intensity and granularity for both positive and negative words. Additionally, the two factors showed differential associations with measures of well-being and adaptability: Sensibility scores were more strongly associated with greater well-being and adaptability measures than Monitoring scores. Association Between Interoceptive Sensibility and Emotional Conceptualization

Kensinger, E. A., & Schacter, D. L. (2006). Processing emotional pictures and words: Effects of valence and arousal. Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience, 6(2), 110–126. https://doi.org/10.3758/CABN.6.2.110. Anderson, A. K., Christoff, K., Stappen, I., Panitz, D., Ghahremani, D. G., Glover, G., … Sobel, N. (2003). Dissociated neural representations of intensity and valence in human olfaction. Nature Neuroscience, 6(2), 196–202. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1038/nn1001. Finally, higher interoceptive sensibility and emotional conceptualization scores are considered to reflect a more efficient functioning of the underlying components, leading to a better adaptation to the environment, and in turn, higher well-being ( Ainley et al., 2016; Barrett et al., 2016; Khalsa et al., 2018; Hoemann et al., 2020). To test for that, we further examined the association between individual differences in interoceptive sensibility and emotional conceptualization and subjective reports of adaptability and well-being. Materials and Methods Participants Small, D. M., Gregory, M. D., Mak, Y. E., Gitelman, D., Mesulam, M. M., & Parrish, T. (2003). Dissociation of neural representation of intensity and affective valuation in human gustation. Neuron, 39(4), 701–711. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0896-6273(03)00467-7.

Schaefer, A., Nils, F., Sanchez, X., & Philippot, P. (2010). Assessing the effectiveness of a large database of emotion-eliciting films: A new tool for emotion researchers. Cognition and Emotion, 24(7), 1153–1172. Monitoring scores were also negatively related to emotional intensity. This result indicates that a higher tendency to focus on the emotions of an individual was associated with lower experienced emotional intensity. Previous studies found that focusing on emotional aspects during the experience or retrieval of an emotional event increases the experienced emotional intensity and arousal, whereas focusing on non-emotional aspects of the event decreases the emotional intensity and arousal ( Denkova et al., 2015; Iordan et al., 2019; Dolcos et al., 2020a, b). Based on that, the current findings suggest that participants with a higher tendency to focus on their emotions during the experience of an emotional episode, may invest their attentional resources in different aspects of the emotional event (i.e., what causes the emotion, what emotion is felt), reducing the experienced emotional intensity. Limitations and Future Considerations

Results

Fujita, F., Diener, E., & Sandvik, E. (1991). Gender differences in negative affect and well-being: The case for emotional intensity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 61(3), 427–434. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.61.3.427. Overall, the results showed a significant improvement in face expression recognition with age for the three tasks. More specifically, the 5-year-olds had lower performances on the three tasks than the 6-year-olds, then a linear improvement from age 6 to adulthood was observed. A different developmental pattern for the emotion matching task was observed, showing that the children aged 4, 6, and 7 had significantly lower performances than on emotion identification and FDT. Finally, the 5-year-olds performed better on identification than matching and FDT, but no difference between emotion matching and FDT was observed. The differences among the three tasks disappeared from age 8 to adulthood. The absence of difference between identification and FDT could be explained by the task condition. In both tasks the emotion expression was named by the experimenter and the participants had to choose the corresponding expression among three faces (identification task) or among three labeled propositions made by the experimenter (FDT). According to the literature, success on these two tasks depends more on semantic representation, which develops early, while matching facial expressions depends more on visual-perception processing, which takes a longer maturation course [ 4, 7, 10]. Frijda, N. H., Mesquita, B., Sonnemans, J., & van Goozen, S. (1991). The duration of affective phenomena or emotions, sentiments and passions. In K. T. Strongman (Ed.), International review of studies on emotion (pp. 187–225). Chichester: Wiley. Lang, P. J., Greenwald, M. K., Bradley, M. M., & Hamm, A. O. (1993). Looking at pictures: Affective, facial, visceral, and behavioral reactions. Psychophysiology, 30(3), 261–273. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8986.1993.tb03352.x.



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